Language and empathy, Part 3: Making choices about language

This is the third and final post in a short series to restart my blogging for another year, and all relate to language learning and empathy. Each of the 3 posts will suggest a new year’s resolution for anybody hoping to develop their connections with others through language in 2016.

Resolution #3. Understand the choices we make when we use language.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Language and empathy, Part 2: English from another point of view

This is the second in a short series of posts to restart my blogging for another year, and all relate to language learning and empathy. Each of the 3 posts will suggest a new year’s resolution for anybody hoping to develop their connections with others through language in 2016.

Resolution #2. Appreciate how your use of language may appear to others.

Continue reading

Teaching unhugged

There is no more pressing question in any field of education than: what is the best way to learn?

Another popular question with a similar intent is: why isn’t student X learning?

Or: why isn’t method X working?

For some time now, I’ve felt that the biggest thing holding back the trendy Communicative Approach is that it’s just too nice to students. Continue reading

Mental health (in ELT)

aldesko

Yesterday, I found postcards like these (see left) scattered around the coffee area at work, along with leaflets, badges and teabags! I was intrigued, so I picked one up.

It turns out that the postcards (and the rest) were reminders that today, 5 February, is Time To Talk Day in the UK.

Time to Talk Day is part of the Time to Change campaign, both of which aim “to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination” across England. Continue reading

Learning, living and loss

I’ve been thinking about this post for a while.

I’ve been trying to work out the connection between thoughts that have been floating around in my mind, sometimes coming up to the surface for closer examination and sometimes sinking back down to the depths until something stirs them up again.

Today I had a conversation with a friend about how hard it can be to weave together many strands of thought into one coherent piece, and he said, “Just say it like that.  Like you just told me.”  So I’m going to give it a go. Continue reading