Our new pronunciation book!

ELF Pronunciation

We are VERY excited to say that our new book, How To Write Pronunciation Activities, is now available on Smashwords, iBooks, and Amazon [affiliate link]. Find out more here.

Some of the things we cover in this book:

  • the challenges of writing pronunciation materials
  • how to support teachers in using pronunciation materials
  • dealing with diversity: ELF and different accents of English
  • pronunciation for listening vs. pronunciation for speaking
  • how to integrate pronunciation activities with other skills areas
  • how to design a syllabus for different levels
  • how to stage pronunciation activities
  • how to write rubrics
  • using the phonemic chart
  • beyond the student’s book: designing homework and supplementary materials
  • useful resources for further reading and resources

The book is very practical, with examples and explanations of all key points, plus exercises to guide the reader in his/her development as a writer of pronunciation materials.

Thank you to everyone…

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#OneThing my student taught me today

Picture the scene, if you will:

  • An ordinary 90-minute intermediate-level adult class.  The second of two lessons this group have in the morning.
  • Ten students, divided into two groups.
  • Each group has a different reading text – authentic articles taken from the TfL and RMT websites about the Tube strike happening in London this week.
  • The students’ task: work together to find 10 given words/phrases in the text and, with reference to the surrounding context and co-text, discuss their meanings.
  • If their can’t resolve any uncertainties through 2-3 minutes of group discussion, they can look in a monolingual dictionary.

Continue reading

IntrovELT: guided reading and writing

This is the second post in a series I’m working on to address my concerns about whether Communicative Language Teaching isn’t a bit hard on more introverted learners, with its almost obsessive focus on maximising speaking and interaction.

In this series, I’m experimenting with some practical classroom ideas that seem to suit learners who are more introvert and prefer activities that allow for individual thinking time, processing language ‘internally’, so to speak, rather than by lots of pair- or group-work.  And I’m sharing the results here!

In this post, I’ll talk about something I tried recently, which I’m just going to call ‘guided reading/writing‘. Continue reading

IntrovELT: responding to images

Just over a year ago, I posted some thoughts about whether Communicative Language Teaching wasn’t a bit hard on more introverted learners, with its almost obsessive focus on maximising speaking and interaction.

I said then that I intended to experiment with (and share) some practical classroom ideas that might suit learners who are more introvert and prefer activities that allow for individual thinking time, processing language ‘internally’, so to speak, rather than by lots of pair- or group-work.

Well, it’s been a while, but I haven’t forgotten about doing this!  I’ve finally got around to writing this post, which outlines one such activity that I recently designed and tried out with a small elementary level class. Continue reading