Pedagogy Pop-up: Everything you always wanted to know about teaching pronunciation* (*but were afraid to ask)

Last summer, inspired by the innovative format of a 10-minute plenary presentation that I gave at a conference in Spain earlier that year, I decided to hold a series of mini-events to share key insights from applied linguistics research with my colleagues (I work for an ELT publisher). I called these short presentations “Pedagogy Pop-ups”, and the principles were simple:

  • just 10 minutes long, easy to fit into a coffee break;
  • purpose is to show how research findings might apply to ELT practice;
  • no audience participation required;
  • no slides.

There were five pop-ups in the series, of which three were video recorded. The first one, about teaching pronunciation, is now available to watch here (https://youtu.be/yyga6vIAroE):

The other Pedagogy Pop-ups in this series were:

Videos are available for the first two – just follow the links.

Note that the original audience for these events was largely composed of ELT publishers and editors, so I may make reference to materials and coursebooks, etc. – but everything I talk about is relevant to teachers and trainers, too.

Enjoy, please share, and feel free to comment below!

This post is part of my “ELT Research In Practice” series.

P.S. I also mention in this pronunciation pop-up that I can share a list of research and other publications that I referred to when compiling my script. Here they are:

Cauldwell, R. (2015). Listening Cherry 13 – Connected speech rules are too genteel. Published online at http://www.speechinaction.org/listening-cherry-13-connected-speech-rules-are-too-genteel/

Crawford, S. Z. & H. L. Moffie (2016). ‘Activities for teaching reduced speech’. TESOL Connections. Available online at http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/tesolc/downloads/features/2016/2016-06_reduced%20speech.pdf

Crystal, D. (2008). ‘Two thousand million?’ English Today, 93, Vol. 24, Issue 1, pp. 3-6.

Derwing, T. M. & M. J. Munro (2009). Putting accent in its place: Rethinking obstacles to communication. Language Teaching and Research, 42 (4), 476-490.

Graddol, D. (2006). English next: Why global English may mean the end of ‘English as a Foreign Language’. Published online by the British Council.

Jenkins, J. (2000). The phonology of English as an International Language: New models, new norms, new goals. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Levis, J. M., S. Sonsaat, S. Link & T. A. Barriuso (2016). Native and non-native teachers of L2 pronunciation: Effects on learner performance. TESOL Quarterly. Published online at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/tesq.272/pdf

Levis, J. & S. Sonsaat (2016). ‘Pronunciation materials’. In M. Azarnoosh et al (eds.), Issues in Materials Development, pp. 109-119. Published by Sense.

Munro, M. & T. Derwing. (1999).  Foreign accent, comprehensibility, and intelligibility in the speech of second language learners. Language Learning, 49 (supp. 1), pp. 285-310.

Saito, K. (2012). ‘Effects of instruction on L2 pronunciation development: A synthesis of 15 quasi-experimental intervention studies.’ TESOL Quarterly, 46/4, pp. 842-854.

Underhill, A. (2015). ‘Proprioception and pronunciation’. Speak Out! The newsletter of the IATEFL Pronunciation Special Interest Group, 53, pp. 25-34.

Walker, R. (2014). ‘Pronunciation Matters’. English Teaching Professional, 90. Available at https://englishglobalcom.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/pronunciation-matters-etp-90.pdf

Walker, R. (2014). ‘Pronunciation Matters’ (presentation slides). Available at https://englishglobalcom.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/pronunciation-matters.pdf

Walter, C. (2009). ‘Teaching phonology for reading comprehension’. Speak Out! The newsletter of the IATEFL Pronunciation Special Interest Group, 40.

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About Laura Patsko

Teacher trainer, language learner, language teacher, linguist, researcher. Not necessarily in that order.

3 comments

  1. How great is all this!?!?!

  2. I liked the contents. Thanks a million. Greetings from Mexico

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